Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Friday, November 30, 2007

How to Chop or Peal Onions without Tears

Do you hate cutting onions because they make you "cry"? Here's some ways to prevent that.

  1. Put the unpeeled onion in the freezer.
  2. Leave the onion in the freezer for about ten minutes.
  3. Remove the onion from the freezer and peel it. The onion can now be sliced, chopped, or minced without tears.

Simply keep your onions in the fridge along with other veggies and you will never cry when chopping them - it's that simple!

You can freeze an onion, just prepare like you were going to use it. Pan fry it before cooling and putting into an airtight container and freeze. This stops the onion going mushy when defrosted. Use as you would any other onion.

If you use a sharp knife, there shouldn't be any tears. An onion makes you cry because acid is being released from the onion. Using a dull knife crushes the onion rather than cutting it, releasing far more of this acid into the air.

Onions that have been frozen raw may tend to be slightly mushy after thawing.

How to Peel an Onion Quickly

Try this method to cut and peel any sized onion in seconds!

  • Cut an onion in half vertically.
  • Place the two halves "cut side down" on the cutting board.
  • Cut off the unusable portions at the top and bottom of each half.
  • Peel back the top layer of each onion half. Your onion is now completely peeled!
  • Rinse the onion halves under cold water to remove any peel residue. Rinsing also reduces the amount of residue that causes your eyes to water when handling onions.

When an onion is halved, it is much easier to cut into thin slices.

Turn your cutting board ninety degrees after slicing, and you can easily dice your onion as well!

If you leave one of the ends attached from the beginning, it is much easier to dice. For slicing however, it is best to remove both ends. Don't forget to remove the end when you are finished slicing.

Always use care when using kitchen knives to avoid cutting yourself.

Always wash your cutting board when switching between cutting meat, poultry or fish and cutting vegetables to avoid cross-contamination of bacteria from one type of food to another.

Use a non-serrated knife: a serrated knife will twist in the onion as it cuts, and create uneven slices, and if you're not careful, can injure you!

Washing your hands along with the stainless steel knife after slicing an onion (or garlic) will remove the scent from your fingers.

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