Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Choosing The Right Eyeglasses

Eyeglasses in the world today have become so fashionable that even some people will wear them without having the need. However, some people really do need glasses and don't wear them for one reason or another. Reasons include: they cannot afford to go to the eye doctor, or they feel glasses do not look all that wonderful on them. Whatever the reason, it is very important to wear your eyeglasses if you need them.

There are several reasons one should wear eyeglasses if it has been deemed necessary. The first one is obvious, so you can see. In most states, you won't be able to get your drivers license if glasses have been prescribed and you refuse to wear them.

Additionally, headaches are common in those who are far sighted or near sighted and do not wear glasses. This is caused from the amount of work your eyes have to do in order to properly function.

People who are farsighted often believe that they can just pick up any old pair of glasses at the grocery store and this will help them see clearer when looking at things close up. This is not true, while some people may have some good luck with this type of reading glasses, most of the population do not. You will still need to visit your eye doctor for a few reasons. First, because regular eye exams help to catch eye diseases right away when they can be treated more easily. Second, because many people require glasses that have a different prescription for each eye, and drug store reading eyeglasses do not offer this, which will lead to headaches.

You can choose eyeglasses that look great on you by following these tips. The shape of the frame should match the shape of your face. The frame's size should fit with the size of your face and the color should compliment your best personal features (such as eye color).

There are seven basic face shapes, before buying eyeglasses you should determine which category you fall under and buy glasses that fit your shape. The seven basic face shapes are round, oval, oblong, base-down triangle, base-up triangle, diamond and square. You should also determine the color that best fits with your overall skin, hair and eye color.

There are a variety of eyeglasses available today. Fashionable eyeglasses are no longer hard to come buy or extremely expensive. You can even get eyeglasses now, which change to sunglasses when you step out into the sun. They can cover lenses with an anti-reflective coat to prevent glare and annoying reflections.

You should visit your eye doctor once a year, two years at the most, for regular eye exams. As people get older, the prescription strength changes in the eyes, which will cause you to purchase new eyeglasses. Of course, if in between eye doctor visits you notice that your eyeglasses are not working as well as they used to, make an appointment for an eye exam right away.

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