Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Friday, March 24, 2006

Consider Lasik: Lose Those Glasses For Good!

Glasses might be a popular fashion accessory, but there is no fun in wearing them out of necessity. Lasik, or laser assisted in situ keratomileusis, is fast becoming one of the most popular ways to deal with short- or long-sightedness, helping spectacle wearers say goodbye to glasses for good.

Sight correction surgery has been available for a number of years, but as in other medical fields, increasing understanding and technical innovations continue to make these surgeries more effective and affordable. There was a time when only the wealthy and the brave could undergo sight correction procedures, but developments like Lasik are widening the options for those with imperfect vision.

Using hi-tech equipment to create a flap in the cornea through which the corneal tissue can be adapted to improve a patient's vision, Lasik is both quick and relatively painless. Unlike the major surgical procedure eye correction formerly represented, Lasik now allows patients to walk in to a clinic and walk out again a short time after. Although extensive eye exams must be performed before the procedure to ensure that the patient's eyes are suitable for treatment, Lasik itself can take less than one minute to correct the sight in one eye.

The procedure itself is almost completely painless. Special drops are used to anesthetize the eyes and for those feeling particularly anxious, a mild sedative can be administered. The patient lies down with the eye in alignment with a special laser. A retaining device is used to keep the eyelid open while the procedure is performed. The laser is used to reshape the cornea; a higher prescription will require slightly longer to complete than those with milder vision impairments.

Once the procedure itself is completed, the patient will be asked to rest briefly. While many normal activities may be resumed the following day, most doctors advise a few days off from work, and rigorous exercise is to be avoided. A post-treatment program will be arranged with your doctor and it is of the utmost importance that this be adhered to completely to ensure the success and continued health of the eyes.

Lasik undoubtedly represents a wonderful opportunity for those who have struggled for years with glasses or contact lenses. While the procedure does not always achieve full twenty-twenty vision, it can afford a huge improvement in a person's sight. So ditch the glasses and discover Lasik - there are many other fashion accessories to try!

For more information on lasik eye surgery visit http://after-lasik.info or http://what-is-laser-eye-surgery.info.

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