Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Friday, March 10, 2006

How to Dress for a Job Interview - Men

Skills, experience and attitude will land you a job, but your interview attire is more important than you think. It's an opportunity to make a good first impression with a potential employer or future boss.

^DNB^DNB

  1. Know the company you will be interviewing with, and research the industry that it's a part of to familiarize yourself with the universal dress code. Ask a friend at the company or stake out the front door to find out what current employees wear.

    ^DNB
  2. Go in a suit and tie to any company that's part of a more formal industry, such as banking or law. Choose a basic black, dark gray or dark navy suit, a matching tie and black leather lace-up shoes. Borrow anything that you may be leery of investing in well in advance to ensure that it's clean and fits well.

    ^DNB
  3. Opt for dressy casual attire for a company that you know doesn't expect suits. Pressed khakis or slacks, a clean, ironed button-down shirt, a belt and a leather loafer will serve you well.

    ^DNB
  4. Match the belt to the color of your shoes. Choose black if your outfit consists of dark grays, navys, browns or black. Opt for dark brown if you'll be wearing tans, muted pastels or medium toned colors.

    ^DNB
  5. Polish or clean your shoes the night before your interview. Scuff marks on your shoes reveal a lack of forethought and attention to detail.

    ^DNB
  6. Keep interview accessories professional. Take a briefcase or nice leather- or vinyl-bound portfolio to carry resume, references or other pertinent documents. Leave tattered manila folders or college logo folders at home.

    ^DNB
  7. Avoid cologne or aftershave that may overpower the interviewer. Place your watch in your pocket once you make it to the front door so that you're not tempted to look at it during the interview.
^DNB^DNB ^DNB

Check your appearance before heading into an interview. Ensure your tie is straight, your teeth are clean and your hair is groomed. ^DNB^DNB

Let your talent and personality get you noticed, not your clothes. Save the bright colors, wild prints and trendy fashions for another occasion. ^DNB^DNB

Do not come in looking like a jewelry shop. Men should limit jewelry to a wristwatch, cufflinks, and a wedding band. Earrings, necklaces, nose rings, and similar items are not interview material (for the man who wants the job). Whatever the type of industry, men should use jewelry sparingly when going for the interview.

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