Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Tuesday, May 02, 2006

How To Wash Your Eyes After LASIK Surgery

By Nicola Kennedy

LASIK is an efficient and fairly innocuous procedure. It is capable of treating several refractive errors, such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. The procedure itself entails virtually no pain and provides rapid recovery. Though the vision will be blurry immediately after surgery, visual acuity will be restored within a few days. However, it takes about 3 to 6 months for the refraction to stabilize. It is imperative that you carry out a scrupulous postoperative regime in order to boost the recovery process and avoid unnecessary complications.

Avoid rubbing your eyes for at least the first week after LASIK surgery. The corneal flap cut out during the surgery requires substantial time to heal. Unnecessary rubbing may inadvertently aggravate the wound. You should also take extreme caution to avoid soap, hair spray or shaving lotion from entering your eyes. The eye surgeon will typically provide you with a postoperative kit, which may include a set of eye shields/goggles. Wear them while you are sleeping, at least for the first three nights after surgery.

For at least a week after LASIK, prevent water from entering your eyes, since water hinders the natural clotting mechanism, and therefore might delay the healing process of the cornea. You must also cancel any swimming plans for a minimum of 10 days following LASIK. You must not wear eye makeup for at least one week after LASIK.

Contact sports are to be avoided for at least a week or so following surgery. Furthermore, it is advised that you wear some kind of protection gear for your eyes for a period of a month, even after resuming exercise and other sporting activities. Bright sunlight may lead to scarring, and therefore, sunglasses are recommended on bright days until the cornea heals.

To summarize, though you will be able to resume your usual lifestyle within a week or so after LASIK surgery, it is crucial that you protect your eyes to prevent injury or infection. And since the corneal flap does not heal instantly after surgery, you must prevent washing your eyes for at least a few days after surgery.

If you find a LASIK surgery that you are confident with, you will be able to get more information about post LASIK complications.

Nicola Kennedy publishes articles and reports, provides news and views and answers the question How Do I Wash My Eyes After LASIK? at Your Lasik Information: http://www.Your-LASIK.info.

This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact. All rights reserved. Copyright Your-LASIK.info

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