Big Button, Braille Telephones, Overlays and The Phone Monocle for Your Cell Phone

With a little practice, most blind individuals learn to dial regular touch tone and rotary telephones without difficulty. However, some individuals may choose to use adaptive telephones.

In this record, we've put together a brief list of places that sell adaptive telephones as well as other helpful products:

  • Phone Merchants.com: http://www.phonemerchants.com/visim.htm carry telephones that feature big buttons and braille markings for each number in the keypad.

  • All Phones.us: http://www.allphones.us offer adapted telephones with jumbo-size buttons and braille. One of their models also announces the numbers as you dial. In addition, when using one of its memory buttons, the phone will announce the name of the person you are calling.

  • Independent Living Aids: http://www.independentliving.com offers a variety of adaptive telephones, including some with built-in talking caller IDs.
    Independent Living also offers Bold Number Overlays for cell phones.

  • Maxi Aids.com: http://www.maxiaids.com is another distributor that has a variety of adaptive telephones. Maxi-aids also carry inexpensive large print overlays that may be used to adapt any telephone you may already have in your home or office.

  • Magnifies Inc.: http://www.thephonemonocle.com is the California company that holds the patents for magnifiers for cell phones, PDA's and Palms and GPS. These Phone Monocles" are available in seven popular colors and allows the screen of any phone to be enlarged for easier viewing. No more reaching for the reading glasses to answer and see the phone display. Video streaming and games are easier to see and play as well. The Phone Monocle is the name given to these screen magnifiers. The Idea behind The Phone Monocle came from a woman named Joanie Taylor. She has several years of Ophthalmology and vision experience.
  • The Giant Caller ID displays calls on a large screen with large text!

    The Giant Caller ID tells you the name, phone number and date of call. It also has a flashing new call indicator. There are 3 lines with large text so you can read the LCD display from several feet away without having to walk over. There's even a repeat call indicator so you can tell you're being called by the same person even if you forget the name or number.

    It stores 50 names and numbers so you can keep track of who called. It's also very easy to fit in wherever you want with a 6-foot long telephone cord included which could allow you to place it in a more visible spot than your phone might be. It has included wall mounts, as well as a 3-position pedestal that makes it very easy to stand on a desk or table.

    It requires 4 AAA batteries for a long period of use, and is 5? x 5? x 3? so it's big enough to be visible from far away but not too big so that it gets in the way.

For tips on how to quickly learn to dial a touch tone or rotary phone, search Fred's Head using the key words: dial telephone.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

UPDATED! Oldies but Goodies: "Established" APH Products

Orbit Reader 20 Removed from APH Catalog

Experiencing Fireworks as a Visually Impaired Person