Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Ten Disgusting Smells and How to Get Rid of Them

Some smells simply hang around no matter what you do. Aerosol sprays just cover them up and make things worse. Natural ways of dealing with them are far more effective.

Here are ten of the most disgusting smells that can invade a home and how to get rid of them:

  1. Fishy Smells: Cooking fresh fish always creates an awful smell and it's hard to get rid of, even after several days. There is a natural and effective way to get fresh air back in the kitchen. Cut a lemon in half and boil it in a little water. The steam disperses the aroma and neutralises the fish smell.
  2. Pet Puddles: White vinegar in warm water will help to get rid of the smell left behind by pet accidents. It is also good for washing away skunk smells.
  3. Damp Cupboard: If you have a cupboard that smells musty and damp put a box of cat litter in there. The cat litter will absorb the damp smell and leave the room/cupboard smelling fresh.
  4. Smelly Microwave: Squeeze half a lemon into some water and place the dish into the microwave. Heat at full power for two minutes. Once the water condenses inside the microwave wipe with a soft absorbent cloth. This will leave your microwave fresh and clean.
  5. Cigarette Smoke: Cigarette smoke in a car can hang around for ages. Soak two towels in white vinegar. Put each into a plastic bowl. Put these near the ashtray and the back seat. Leave over night. When you take the bowls out the smell will have disappeared.
  6. Stale Smelling Fridge: To freshen your fridge soak a piece of cotton wool in vanilla and leave inside. It will give it a fresh and clean aroma. A dish with baking soda in it works well too.
  7. Sour Milk Smells: Get rid of the smell of stale, sour milk on fabrics. Soak in white vinegar for a couple of hours and wash as usual. If you can't wash the fabric, dab the area with tissue and then apply white vinegar. Dab again and get the area as dry as possible. You might have to do this several times.
  8. Stale Freezer Smell: Freezer defrosted? The smell can be really bad. Empty the freezer and wash out with soap and warm water then wash the inside with bicarbonate of soda dissolved in a little water. Finally put a cut onion in the bottom and leave overnight. Remove the onion and leave the door of the freezer open for a while. This should get rid of the bad smell.
  9. Musty Old Carpets: To take smells out of old carpets, use a steam cleaner and put a scoop of Oxyclean, or similar product into the water. It will freshen it up and stop the odour.
  10. Plastic Containers: Plastic containers can sometimes smell, especially if they are stored with their lids on. Crumple a piece of newspaper and place it inside the container. Replace the lid and leave overnight. This will remove the smell.

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