American History In Video

From the website:

"American History in Video provides the largest and richest online collection of video available for the study of American history, 2,000 hours and more than 5,000 titles on completion. The collection's wealth of video and multiplicity of perspectives allow students and scholars to see, experience, and study American history in ways never before possible .

Indexing and searchable transcripts synchronized to video give the ability to drill down in seconds to find the footage of interest from thousands of hours of video. This collection is an exclusive collaboration with the A&E Television Networks and features some of their most important documentaries and series from The History Channel, A&E Network, and Biography. Historical coverage ranges from the lost colony of Roanoke through the 1988 Vicennes Affair in the Persian Gulf; biographical coverage ranges from eighteenth century figures such as Benedict Arnold and Daniel Boone to modern day figures such as Thurgood Marshall and Helen Thomas.

Several types of video footage have been chosen to provide a well-rounded collection for historical study:

  • Documentaries from key partners such as The History Channel and others provide long-term perspectives on historical events, historical people, and key turning points in American history. These documentaries often incorporate contemporaneous footage and photographs; feature interviews with citizens, newsmakers, and other witnesses to history; and make the knowledge, expertise, and enthusiasm of numerous scholars, historians, and researchers readily available. Judicious reenactments of historical moments, particularly with the Civil War, help students visualize important aspects of history, such as the impact of military strategies and tactics on historical outcomes.
  • Newsreels, routinely shown before feature films in movie houses, were the only way for citizens to see American and foreign events and news during the pre-television era. With contemporaneous footage and coverage of a wide variety of stories, from war and politics, to fashion and sports, and more, newsreels remain a valuable window on American history, society, and culture. American History in Video is the only source where the entire series of United News (governmental newsreel from the Office of War Information) and Universal Newsreel (commercial newsreel from Universal Pictures Company, Inc.) stream in full online. Forthcoming in Spring 2009 are complete sets of Semantically Indexed and searchable Release Notes, the original documentation provided for each newsreel release in each series.
  • Public affairs video from series like Longines Chronoscope (Columbia Broadcasting System) were usually created to provide contemporaneous analysis on issues of the day. Through interviews and debates with politicians, diplomats, and a range of foreign and American experts and leaders in a variety of fields, these videos shine a light on the topics, issues, and people considered newsworthy, as well as the received wisdom, in a given time period.
  • Archival footage adds another critical dimension to historical analysis, with coverage of events and people for an often more specific purpose than other�types of video.

Taken together, this rich combination allows students and scholars to study history in new ways." Click this link to visit American History In Video: http://ahivfree.alexanderstreet.com.

If you're looking for a good "Today in History" site, The History Channel has a video version of this service.

Click this link to watch Today in History from the History Channel: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do.

NBC News Time Capsule

One of the features of Hulu is a collection of old news segments and entire news programs from NBC. Hulu calls this collection of segments and programs the NBC News Time Capsule. Included in the line-up are Kennedy's inauguration, the first Today Show, and the first Apollo 11 Moon Special.

Teachers of US History may find the videos in the NBC News Time Capsule to be helpful in teaching lessons on 20th century US History. Teachers of media studies may also find the videos useful for lessons on changes in reporting and improvements in broadcast production over the last fifty years.

Click this link to visit the NBC News Time Capsule on Hulu.

Comments

Astin Sharon said…
this is really very good post

Popular posts from this blog

President Trump Signs Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act

UPDATED! Oldies but Goodies: "Established" APH Products