Fred’s Head from APH, a Blindness Blog

Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Thursday, March 19, 2009

Three Books about Blindness & Related Topics

While looking through The Braille Forum from the American Council of the Blind, I found the following three books and wanted to share them with you.

Words in My Hands

Diane Chambers has a degree in therapeutic recreation and is a sign language interpreter. She has also written, Words in My Hands: A Teacher, A Deaf-Blind Man, An Unforgettable Journey. This is a true story about Bert Riedel, an elderly deaf-blind man who played classical piano. Before he lost his sight and hearing to Usher syndrome, he was a dentist in Lombard, Ill. Diane met Bert when he was 86 years old and taught him how to read tactile sign language.

While the story illustrates psychosocial factors that complicate the disabilities of deafness and deaf-blindness, it carries an inspirational message as well. It shows that miracles can happen where there are dedicated professionals and caregivers.

For more information about the book, visit www.ellexapress.citymax.com or contact Diane Chambers at 303-591-1040.

As I See It

As I See It by Robert Theodore Branco is a collaboration of events and facts presented by a blind adult. It discusses a wide variety of topics relating to blindness, including discrimination, myths, adaptive technology, training, legislation, etc. The book's ISBN is 9781434323521 and is available through http://www.authorhouse.com.

Dealing with Vision Loss

Blind since birth, Fred Olver has devoted his life to demolishing stereotypes and breaking down barriers, and as a rehabilitation teacher, he has taught others facing vision loss to do the same. Now Olver presents a comprehensive guide for anyone directly or indirectly affected by vision loss in his book, Dealing With Vision Loss (published by AuthorHouse).

Olver offers answers and hope for individuals losing their vision, their family members, parents of visually impaired children, those who interact with the visually impaired on a regular basis and people interested in pursuing a degree to work with the visually impaired. Dealing with Vision Loss is also a vast resource of practical information, explaining how to find everything from talking watches to braille playing cards to magnifiers.

For more information, go to www.dealingwithvisionloss.com, or contact Fred Olver at 314-226-9699.

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