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Fred’s Head, offered by the American Printing House for the Blind, contains tips, techniques, tutorials, in-depth articles, and resources for and by blind or visually impaired people. Our blog is named after the legendary Fred Gissoni, renowned for answering a seemingly infinite variety of questions on every aspect of blindness.

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Wednesday, March 03, 2010

How to Tell if a Pineapple Is Ripe

How to Tell if a Pineapple Is Ripe

from wikiHow - The How to Manual That You Can Edit
How do you tell when a pineapple is ripe and fresh? Many of us have experienced the rapidly deteriorating pineapple or the underripe pineapple. If you want to get it right, there are some little tricks guaranteed to help you choose the right pineapple each time.

Steps

  1. Be alert for two key elements of a ripe pineapple: freshness and deterioration. You are looking for a fresh pineapple, not a rotting one. The stem is the area of the pineapple that feeds sugar to the fruit. It is from here that the pineapple changes color.
  2. If you have some vision, look at the pineapple. It should reflect a golden yellow color. The minimum area for this should be on the eyes at the base of the fruit. Never purchase a pineapple that is fully green as it will not ripen well. The higher the color rises up the pineapple, the sweeter it will be. The pineapples in the photo above indicate good coloring.
  3. Smell the pineapple. If it smells sweet, then it's ready. If it has no scent, it's not ripe. If it smells fermented, it's over ripe!
  4. Touch the pineapple gently. It should be firm to a gentle press and only yield slightly.
  5. Beware the myth! It is an urban myth that a pineapple is ripe when a leaf can be removed from the crown easily. It is proof of nothing in terms of ripeness.
  6. Beware the deteriorating pineapple. A deteriorating pineapple will be a reddish, bronze color or it may even be green. It will smell as if it is fermenting, like vinegar. It will also be mushy when pushed gently and it will likely have wrinkled skin. Other clear indications include mold, oozing sticky juices, cracks in the skin and leaves turning brown and dropping off.

Tips

  • Pick the pineapple that is the cleanest and brightest. A larger pineapple will obviously yield a greater quantity of fruit, but may also cost more if sold by weight.
  • Buy the pineapple the same day that you intend to use it; that way, it will be fresh and will not deteriorate further.
  • Be aware that some pineapples are considered to be ripe when green. This is the claim of those promoting them; you be the judge by testing them when green. The varieties that claim this include the Central American pineapple and some Hawaiian pineapples.
  • If you must store the pineapple, do so in the upper part of the refrigerator at a forty-five degree angle. Do not leave it there for more than 2 - 3 days.

Things You'll Need

  • Pineapple

Related wikiHows

Article provided by wikiHow, a wiki how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Tell if a Pineapple Is Ripe. All content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons license.

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