Refinance & Mortgage Guide for People with Disabilities

Many people with disabilities agree that one way of taking charge and exercising some degree of control in their lives is by becoming a home owner. If you are currently a home owner who has recently been disabled, you may have new physical, mental and financial restrictions and needs which affect or even threaten your ongoing ability to maintain your home. Results of recent studies also reveal that only a small segment of the disabled populace own their own residences. Instead, the majority of the nation’s disabled live in group residences, therapeutic or rehabilitation institutions, nursing facility complexes, or in the home of a family member. A small percentage of children with disabilities live in adoptive or foster homes; and some communities, churches, civic groups and charitable organizations are now promoting programs which encourage families to sponsor a senior citizen, adolescent or child who is mentally challenged or physically impaired.

This guide seeks not only to provide the reader with the most relevant and essential resources needed to navigate the myriad of red tape and sometimes rigid processes regularly associated with real estate purchases; it also aims to educate you.

By reading this guide, you should have a basic understanding of the following:

  • The advantages and disadvantages of purchasing a home
  • Keys steps to follow in the buying process
  • The types of mortgages available to you as a home buyer
  • Financial and Legal resources available to you
  • Final tips & Warnings
Click this link to read Refinance & Mortgage Guide for People with Disabilities.

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