Throwback Thursday Object: Script Letter Board from 1963

Our object this week is a Script-Letter Board from 1963. When schools for the blind were founded in the United States in the 19th century, handwriting was a big part of the curriculum. There were numerous handwriting guides being invented and marketed. Most of that started to go away in the 1870s with the invention of the typewriter. But students still needed to be able to sign their name in cursive letters. Designed for student practice in making muscular movements for handwriting, the APH Script-Letter Board was made of rigid black plastic and featured recessed script letters that can be traced with a stylus or pencil. Around 1990 APH redesigned the product, made thicker (1/8") and from a white plastic rather than black PVC. You can still buy the revised model today.

Micheal A. Hudson
Museum Director
American Printing House for the Blind

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