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Showing posts from February, 2018

Throwback Thursday: Legendary Publisher of the Washington Post Visits APH

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The Academy Award buzz for Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks’ new movie “The Post” caused me to remember that Katherine Graham, the legendary publisher of the Washington Post, visited APH in 1989.  Streep plays Graham in the movie.  Our Throwback Thursday object this week is a photograph from that day, October 5th, 1989.  Legendary APH narrator Terry Hales Sales stands in a crowd of well-wishers shaking Ms. Graham’s hand on our front steps. Terry is looking back at the camera and Ms. Graham has a large flower pinned to her dress.  Our studio manager, Steve Mullins, stands off to the left.  He has the required patches on his jacket elbows.  I had a coat just like it.  At the time Steve was a monitor, what we now call a talking book editor.  APH had begun recording the Talking Newsweek Magazine in 1959—we still record and distribute it today!—and the company was celebrating the 30th anniversary of the partnership with Graham and Newsweek Magazine.  In 1989, our recorded magazines came on flexi…

Quick Tip: Our Core Values, Part 1: Respect. Get a better idea of what things drive us to do what we do at APH and find out how you can comment on how we're doing.

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Quick Tip Video: Slide, Twist 'N Solve. Hours of fun with this tactile toy await you!

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Quick Tip Video: Music Braille Code 2015

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Throwback Thursday Object: the VersaPoint Duo Braille Embosser

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Technology is changing so quickly.  Today’s modern miracle becomes a dusty paperweight almost overnight.  Our museum tries to save these dinosaurs, but the pace of obsolescence and even extinction is so rapid that it is often unclear what is a significant technological landmark and what is an abandoned rabbit hole.  Our object this month, a VersaPoint Duo braille embosser from 2000, turned out to be much more interesting than I initially thought, so I am feeling vindicated about all the other dusty paperweights!
The VersaPoint had its origins in the work of Canadian inventor Roland Galarneau (1922-2011).  I had never heard of Galarneau, but I found an online exhibitthat tells his story.  Galarneau, blind himself, completed the first version of his "Converto-Braille" device by 1972, essentially a computer linked to an electric typewriter that could translate print into braille.  In 1982, Galerneau sold the manufacturing rights to his second generation model to Telesensoryin C…